Picking Your Nose Can Lead To Alzheimer’s, As Per New Study

Picking Your Nose Can Lead To Alzheimer’s, As Per New Study
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In mice, bacteria are able to enter the brain by way of the olfactory nerve in the nose. Once there, the bacteria produce markers that are characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease, which indicates that the mice have contracted the disease. Picking at your nose can cause damage to the lining of your nose, which can lead to an increase in the number of bacteria that can travel to your brain.

Researchers from Griffith University have shown that a bacteria may enter the brains of mice via the olfactory nerve, where it produces signs that are diagnostic of Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers found that Chlamydia pneumonia, a form of bacteria that may cause respiratory infections like pneumonia, targets the central nervous system via the nerve connecting the nasal cavity and the brain. In reaction, Alzheimer’s disease-related amyloid beta protein was deposited in brain cells. The research paper was published in the January issue of Scientific Reports.

Unlike other nerves in the body, the olfactory nerve in the nose is open to the air and provides a direct route to the brain that avoids the latter’s protective barrier of blood and plasma. It’s a simple entry point for bacteria and viruses to the brain.

The Center’s research team is already plotting their next steps toward confirming the existence of a similar pathway in humans. Human testing is required to verify the pathway’s functionality in this context. It’s an area of study that has been proposed extensively but has not yet been carried out. We know that these germs are also found in people, but we don’t know how they got there.

Nose picking and removing nose hairs are not recommended. Picking as well as plucking can cause damage to the nasal lining, which we obviously want to avoid. To a greater extent, bacteria can enter the brain if the nasal lining is damaged.


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Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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