Pfizer Vaccine Less Effective for the Delta Variant

Pfizer Vaccine Less Effective for the Delta Variant
SHARE

Israel has already vaccinated more than 5 million citizens, 57% of the countries’ population, according to the latest statistics. It is safe to say that the vaccination campaign in this country is on track and that relaxing the rules was a good call.

This Monday, the Israeli government released a statement in which it announced their studies regarding the effectiveness of the Pfizer vaccine on the Delta variant. As cited by CNN, the statement included a statistic in which the Pfizer vaccine protects 64% against the infection with the SARS-CoV-2 Delta variant. The results are not positive considering the fact that their statistics also showed in the past that the BioNTech vaccine was 95.3% effective against the Alpha variant. 

Is there any good news?

Israel also mentioned that the good news is that the Pfizer vaccine was 93% effective in preventing severe cases of COVID 19 infections that would need long-term hospitalization. Other scientists and researchers believe it is a bit too early to determine how effective the Pfizer vaccine in preventing severe cases is. What is clear is that the Delta variant is much more spreadable and dangerous for our health. 

Are there any other studies?

All over the world, governments, scientists, public health officers, researchers, virologists and plenty of other professionals are working hard on studying the different variants into which the virus can mutate, both in a natural environment as well as inside the lab. So far, all the studies have one good piece of news in common. The existing vaccines are efficient in preventing severe COVID-19 cases. 

All the available vaccines against the SARS-CoV-2 virus are being improved, and all the manufacturers are studying their effectiveness against all known COVID-19 variant.

In Europe, the most used vaccines have been Pfizer, Moderna, Astra Zeneca and Johnson& Johnson, but unfortunately, the vaccination campaign in some countries have slowed down. This is a pity since so many other countries in the third world desperately look for more doses to help their people.  

 


SHARE
Asheley Rice

I am a pop culture and social media expert. Aside from writing about the latest news health, I also enjoy pop culture and Yoga. I have BA in American Cultural Studies and currently enrolled in a Mass-Media MA program. I like to spend my spring breaks volunteering overseas.

Share this post

Post Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.