Diagnosing & Treating Ocular Hypertension

Diagnosing & Treating Ocular Hypertension
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Ocular hypertension is also known as high-normal or masked hypertension. It is a condition in which the pressure inside the eye is slightly increased. High blood pressure, in general, makes the blood vessels narrower, increasing resistance and pressure. If this pressure remains consistently above normal levels, it can be dangerous. Any organ can be affected by High blood pressure, but it typically involves the heart and arteries. It causes strain on these organs because they aren’t receiving enough oxygenated blood to meet their demands.

Consequently, the heart has to work harder to supply your body with adequate amounts of red blood cells and deliver them to where they are needed. Hypertension affects numerous people worldwide; however, it often goes undetected until serious complications arise. Lucky enough, you can take a few steps to check if you are at risk for hypertensive eyes by visiting eye doctor omaha.

What are the different types of ocular hypertension?

There are three types of ocular hypertension: Primary, secondary, and pseudo. Primary ocular hypertension is a condition that causes the eye pressure to rise above the normal level. The cause of this condition is unknown. Secondary ocular hypertension occurs due to an underlying medical condition, such as diabetes or kidney disease. Pseudo ocular hypertension is a condition in which the eye pressure is normal, but the patient is sensitive to eye drops. Therefore, the pressure inside the eye increases with eye drops.

Detecting Ocular Hypertension

Ophthalmologists recommend a thorough eye examination every two years. During the exam, they check the internal pressure of the eye. This is often the first indication of hypertension, especially when the pressure is still within the normal range. However, there are a few other ways to detect ocular hypertension.

One of the most common methods is measuring the thickness of the cornea and retina. The thickness of these tissues is directly connected to the internal eye pressure. Another way to detect ocular hypertension is by measuring the thickness of the optic disc. The optic disc is the black part of the eye, where the blood vessels are located and the nerves connecting the eye to the brain end. In ocular hypertension, the blood vessels become thicker in the disc, remaining thin in normal eyes.

Why is detecting ocular hypertension important?

Hypertensive eyes can lead to glaucoma, which can cause blindness if left untreated. Although there is no cure, you can manage the condition through medication and lifestyle changes. The earlier you detect ocular hypertension, the more likely you will prevent it from progressing to glaucoma. Ocular hypertension is a risk factor for developing glaucoma and many other eye diseases.

How can you detect Ocular Hypertension?

A comprehensive eye examination is the only way to determine if you have ocular hypertension. During the exam, your eye doctor will check your eye pressure, look at the inside of your eye with an instrument called a slit lamp, and examine the structures around the eye. Nevertheless, certain symptoms can indicate the presence of ocular hypertension. If you have noticed any change in your vision, it could indicate ocular hypertension. However, it is important to note that these changes are often unnoticeable to the naked eye. The following symptoms can hint at the possibility of ocular hypertension: – Change in the structure of the eye – Dilated blood vessels in the eye – Thickening of the cornea – Thickening of the retina – Enlarged optic nerve.

3 Must-Have Tools to Detect Ocular Hypertension

An eye pressure meter: This device measures the internal pressure inside the eye. It is a very simple test that only takes a few seconds. You have to put the device inside your eye, press a button and read the results. A tonometer – This is used to measure the thickness of the cornea. It is a painless test that only takes a few seconds. You have to put the tool inside your eye and press a button. An optic disc ruler is used to measure the thickness of the optic disc, which is the black part of the eye and where the blood vessels are located. The above-mentioned tools are easy to use and determine if you have ocular hypertension. Ocular hypertension can also be detected through the structure of the eye, blood vessels, and the optic disc.

Conclusion

Hypertension can affect any organ in the body and can be dangerous if left untreated. Fortunately, it is easy to detect ocular hypertension. There are a few ways to detect ocular hypertension, including measuring the thickness of the cornea, blood vessels, and the optic disc. The best way to detect ocular hypertension is through a comprehensive eye examination.


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Asheley Rice

I am a pop culture and social media expert. Aside from writing about the latest news health, I also enjoy pop culture and Yoga. I have BA in American Cultural Studies and currently enrolled in a Mass-Media MA program. I like to spend my spring breaks volunteering overseas.

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