Can Dairy Products Prevent Heart Disease? Here’s What Science Says

Can Dairy Products Prevent Heart Disease? Here’s What Science Says
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A diet rich in dairy may protect against heart disease, according to new research. Adults who eat a heavy dairy diet are up to 25% less susceptible to heart disease, according to research. Previous research usually has skewed the opposite direction and connected milk with heart issues, because cholesterol and fat are abundant in products like milk and cheese. However, this might not be true.

“But the most recent Australian study indicates that additional nutrients in dairy products protect the heart and aid in its regular function. While some dietary guidelines continue to suggest consumers choose low-fat dairy products, others have moved away from that advice. Instead, suggesting dairy can be part of a healthy diet with an emphasis on selecting certain dairy foods — for example, yoghurt rather than butter — or avoiding sweetened dairy products that are loaded with added sugar,” explained co-author Dr. Matti Marklund.

Researchers spent 16 years following the individuals and reported the number of cardiovascular incidents and fatalities. Data indicated that 25% less likely to get cardiac issues were those who consumed dairy regularly than those who ate less dairy in their diet.

Other dairy health benefits

  • Boosting bone health. Another benefit of calcium is that it can help promote healthy bones by building and maintaining strong bones throughout life. This can help prevent osteoporosis, a condition where you have weak bones that break easily so they can no longer support your body weight.
  • Supporting a healthy immune system. Dairy products contain antibodies called immunoglobulins, which help strengthen your immune system by helping to fight infection when you’re exposed to germs like influenza or colds. This is why people with allergies often benefit from eating dairy products; these antibodies act as an extra layer of protection against allergic reactions when they come in contact with certain food allergens like peanuts or shellfish.

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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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