ADHD – What are the Symptoms For Children?

ADHD – What are the Symptoms For Children?
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The problem with diagnosing attention deficit disorder (ADHD) is that the symptoms can be subtle. A parent may notice that their child is inattentive, fidgety and often restless, but the child may not exhibit any of the classic ADHD symptoms such as hyperactivity or impulsive behavior.

However, if a parent suspects ADHD, they should ask the child’s doctor for a referral to a specialist. A psychologist or psychiatrist with experience in diagnosing ADHD can order tests that assess ADHD, including behavioral and rating scales.

ADHD is a common condition affecting 5 to 9 percent of school-age children, resulting in an unequal distribution of ADHD symptoms. Boys are four times more likely than girls to have ADHD, and Caucasians and Asians are more likely to have ADHD than blacks and Hispanics. However, ADHD can occur in any race or ethnicity.

“If you suspect your child may have ADHD, you may also be wondering at what age a proper diagnosis can be made. ADHD is a common neurodevelopmental disorder affecting 2% to 16% of the school-age population worldwide. It’s estimated that in South Africa, one in 20 children and at least 1 million adults suffer from ADHD. The disorder is most commonly diagnosed in childhood and lasts into adulthood,” explains Murray Hewlett, chief executive of Affinity Health.

Children with ADHD tend to have a harder time following rules, staying focused, and completing tasks. Their behavior can be disruptive and interfere with their education, family relationships and friendships. ADHD can lead to low self-esteem and self-criticism, increased anxiety and depression, and behavioral problems. Children with ADHD often exhibit impulsive behavior, such as blurting out answers impulsively, being easily distracted, and being unable to wait for their turn. Children with ADHD may also have unusual sleeping habits. For example, they may fall asleep suddenly, wake up frequently during the night, or sleep for more than 10 hours straight. They may also wake up early, even on weekends, and have trouble falling asleep again.


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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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