Green Mediterranean Diet Is Highly Effective Against Visceral Fat

Green Mediterranean Diet Is Highly Effective Against Visceral Fat
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Visceral adipose tissue is a form of fat that surrounds internal organs and is considerably more hazardous than the extra layer of fat that builds up around your waist. The green Mediterranean diet (MED) helps lower visceral adipose tissue by a large amount.

Visceral fat is believed to be the real aim of weight loss since it is a more significant determinant than a person’s weight or the size of their waist. Over time, visceral fat will accumulate between organs and produce hormones and toxins that have been related to cardiovascular disease, diabetes, dementia, and mortality at an earlier age.

The experiment

In a clinical interventional experiment known as the DIRECT PLUS, participants were given one of three diets: the green Mediterranean diet, the traditional Mediterranean diet, or a healthy diet. After further investigation, it was shown that the green Med diet lowered visceral fat by 14%, while the Med diet only lowered it by 7%, and the healthy diet only lowered it by 4.5%. In the experiment that lasted for 18 months, there were a total of 294 volunteers that took part. The findings of the study were presented in BMC Medicine.

The research team working on the DIRECT-PLUS experiment was the one that initially proposed the idea of a diet based on green and Mediterranean foods. This healthier alternative to the typical Mediterranean diet (MED) contains fewer servings of red and processed meat and more dietary polyphenols than the standard MED diet. In addition to consuming walnuts (28 grams) on a daily basis, the participants drank between three and four cups of green tea and ingested 100 grams of duckweed green shake on a daily basis. The aquatic green plant known as duckweed is an excellent source of replacement meat intake due to its high levels of bioavailable protein, iron and vitamins. The team has demonstrated in earlier research that the green MED diet has a number of beneficial impacts that range from the microbiota to age-related degenerative disorders. 

 


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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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