Dietary Fatty Acids Consumption Might Boost Hypertension Risks

Dietary Fatty Acids Consumption Might Boost Hypertension Risks
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Hypertension is one of the leading causes of heart disease, and it might be even lethal as it might cause heart attack and stroke. While many previous studies looked into how dietary habits influence high blood pressure, the newest research in this regard focused on how the dietary fatty acids consumption impacts on hypertension risks.

According to the study, the intake of a specific type of dietary fatty acids, known as n-6 fatty acids, might indeed boost hypertension risks.

“There have been conflicting reports of the relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and risk of hypertension,” says Hiroyuki Nakamura, the corresponding author of the study. “Metabolites of n-6 fatty acids can lower blood pressure in a manner influenced by blood glucose levels. Therefore, we suspected that the relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and the risk of hypertension might be affected by glucose tolerance, which is impaired in patients with diabetes.”

Dietary Fatty Acids Consumption Influences Hypertension Risks

The scientists noticed that healthy people who consumed dietary fatty acids also present hypertension, while those patients with diabetes, who took n-6 fatty acids, showed improvements regarding their blood pressure.

“Our analyses revealed a relationship between dietary intake of n-6 fatty acids and glycated hemoglobin in the blood (our definition of diabetes), which has not been previously established,” explained Haruki Nakamura, the study’s leading author.

“A previous meta-analysis showed that higher intake of a diet rich in linoleic acid (the main fatty acid in the n-6 fatty acids class) was significantly associated with higher risks of death from all causes, cardiovascular disease, and coronary heart disease in subjects with cardiovascular disease. Therefore, our results indicate that n-6 fatty acid intake may have no cardiovascular benefit in subjects who are at risk for cardiovascular disease or diabetes,” Nakamura concluded.


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