A New Diet Could Help Runners with Stomach Issues

A New Diet Could Help Runners with Stomach Issues
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Anew study argues that the removal of specific foods from a diet could help people that experience stomach issues when they attempt to exercise.

It is well-known that people who exercise (with a focus on runners) are vulnerable to symptoms that are similar to those of irritable bowel syndrome. Older research has revealed that a diet which contains limited amounts of oligosaccharide, disaccharide, polyol and monosaccharide has the potential to help people afflicted by IBS.

The recent study notes that a low FODMAP diet as able to reduce most of the issues that are linked to exercise, including stomach cramps and bloating. The researchers studied a group that practiced recreational exercises. The members of the group followed two eating plans that were switched each week, with the main difference being represented by the amount of FODMAP products.

FOODMAP foods are rich in lactose (milk, cheese and yogurts), galactic oligosaccharides (onions and other legumes) fructans (encountered in bread, pasta and cereals), polyols (added additives) and a high amount of fructose (asparagus, apples and pears). The participants completed survey at the start and end of each eating plan. They provided data on how they felt and the issues that were experienced while exercising.

The study notes that a staggering 69% of the people that followed a low FODMAP diet plan reported improved physical performance and a lower number of issues. One of the researchers has declared that the study proves that a low FODMAP diet is able to reduce most of the issues that are associated with exercising. It is thought that a lower amount of intestinal water and gas contribute to the general well-being. The lower amount of indigestible carbohydrates is also beneficial.

Professional athletes enjoy better results because they receive a personalized diet plan that suits their need. While such a diet would be great for everyone it is a bit hard to practice. Further research will be needed in order to verify the long-term benefits of the diet.


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