3 Lies About Fitness That You Can Stop Believing This Year

3 Lies About Fitness That You Can Stop Believing This Year
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When it comes to getting fit, there’s a lot of confusing information floating around.   Yes, there are always new fitness trends, routines, and diet fads that build up and then fizzle out over time; however, there is also some very good information that you can take advantage of to help you get your best body ever. Trying new things is a great way to motivate yourself and keep your workout routine fresh. But, when it comes to getting fit and staying in shape, learning what not to do can be just as important as knowing what to do. Here are three fitness myths you should avoid in 2022:

  1. Weight lifting will make me bulky. This is an old myth that has been destroyed over and over again by science. While it is true that women have less testosterone than men, and therefore can’t build as much muscle mass, it’s highly unlikely for a woman to become bulky from weight training. The most you should expect to see through weight training is a slight increase in muscle mass. However, this will not be very visible if you are not already fairly muscular, to begin with.
  2. You can spot reduce fat. Many people will work a specific muscle thinking it will help them lose weight in that area. The truth is that fat loss happens all over your body at once so no one area will be targeted by doing this kind of training. If you are trying to lose weight it is better to move more and eat healthy than it is to train a specific area.
  3. Cardio should be intense. Some people think they have to train as hard as they possibly can to see results — but that isn’t true. If you’re exercising too strenuously, your body will produce excess cortisol, a stress hormone that breaks down muscle tissue instead of building it up. This can make working out counterproductive because you’ll lose muscle and actually end up weighing more than if you’d done nothing at all. Here’s what intensity actually looks like: You should feel “challenged” and slightly uncomfortable during your workout — but not to an extreme point.

 


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Anna Daniels

Anna is an avid blogger with an educational background in medicine and mental health. She is a generalist with many other interests including nutrition, women's health, astronomy and photography. In her free time from work and writing, Anna enjoys nature walks, reading, and listening to jazz and classical music.

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