Honeybees Hives Don’t Help The Environment

Honeybees Hives Don’t Help The Environment
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Bees are amazing insects that mean a lot to the environment. However, some bees species are on the brink of extinction due to pesticides use, humans interventions on the environment, and other risk factors. Moreover, honeybees hives don’t help the environment or the bees species revival.

Jonas Geldmann, a professor at the University of Cambridge, got disturbed by more and more frequent campaigns which promote honey and honey products as well as honeybees fundraisings. He thinks all these are in vain because honeybees hives don’t help the environment, but on the contrary, as they are not natural. Geldmann explains that environmental-friendly and helpful bees are only the wild bees that live in the wild and are pollinating flowering plants, majorly contributing to the health of the ecosystem.

Nigel Raine, a researcher at the University of Guelph in Canada, has a wide collection of wild bees kept in his insectarium. He explains that many wild bees are of the same size as flies and, often, gardeners confuse them with flies.

On the other side, there are farmed honeybees, which are originally from Europe and are grown by beekeepers in artificial beehives. Honeybees are bigger and more resistant than many species of wild bees, and the latter has almost no chance to compete for food. Geldmann considers that a healthy environment needs bees but not honeybees, as he adds that growing bees in hives and nature conservation has nothing in common.

Specialists consider that every one of us is still learning when it comes to bees. Fortunately, some of the measures to protect honeybees are also helpful for the wild bees. For instance, preservation of big pesticides-free fields with wildflowers is beneficial for both honeybees and wild bees.

A future destruction of wild bee species will have a very negative impact on the environment, so people must help more the tiny wild bees then the farmed honeybees.


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