A Dumbo Octopus Newborn Was Caught On Video For The First Time Ever

A Dumbo Octopus Newborn Was Caught On Video For The First Time Ever
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An octopus newborn has been caught on video for the first time ever by Tim Shank, an ecologist at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, in Massachusetts, in the USA.

Flapping its huge ears, which are as big as its body, the Dumbo Octopus newborn swam inside a small glass dish. It is amusing how the little sea creature bumps its tiny body against the dish’s sides, as it was trying to crack it in order to get free.

The newborn is part of Grimpoteuthis species, also known as Dumbo Octopus. Dumbo Octopus swim with the help of its 8 limbs but also with its big flapping ears that earned for it the “Dumbo” nickname as a reminder of the well-known Disney character.

The Dumbo Octopus newborn is looking like an adult Dumbo Octopus but only smaller and that makes it be adorable and really “charismatic”. These very characteristics help the little octopus to become an Internet star as the video shot by Tim Shank is set to go viral, while many people have already shown appreciation for the little sea creature.

The video, however, was part of a study conducted on the Dumbo octopus newborn

The study aimed to observe the behavior of the Dumbo Octopus newborn.

Not many things are known about the Dumbo Octopus (Grimpoteuthis), but researchers are doing their best to study these surprising sea creatures and to obtain important information about them in order to understand how the environmental changes affect these creatures and what measures should scientists take in order to protect them.

The researchers, led by Tim Shank, observed that the octopus newborn was acting like adult octopuses. Even more, the newborn’s body is already prepared for catching prey, so, Tim Shank and his team concluded that Dumbo Octopus newborns are able to manage by themselves, including catching prey, and are not at all similar to what we see in mammals’ newborns which need parents’ protection and attention in the first months of their life.


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